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Definición de “desert” en inglés

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desert

noun [C or U] uk   /ˈdez.ət/ us    /-ɚt/
A2 an area, often covered with sand or rocks, where there is very little rain and not many plants: They were lost in the desert for nine days. We had to cross a large area of arid, featureless desert. the desert suncultural, intellectual, etc. desert disapproving a place that is considered to have no cultural, intellectual, etc. quality or interest: This town is a cultural desert.
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desert

verb uk   /dɪˈzɜːt/ us    /-ˈzɝːt/

desert verb (RUN AWAY)

[I or T] to leave the armed forces without permission and with no intention of returning: Soldiers who deserted and were caught were shot. How many people desert from the army each year?

desert verb (LEAVE BEHIND)

[T] to leave someone without help or in a difficult situation and not come back: He deserted his wife and family for another woman. [T] If a quality deserts you, you suddenly and temporarily lose it: All my confidence/courage deserted me when I walked into the exam.
Traducciones de “desert”
en coreano 사막…
en árabe صَحْراء…
en francés abandonner, déserter…
en turco çöl…
en italiano deserto…
en chino (tradicionál) 沙漠,荒漠…
en ruso пустыня…
en polaco pustynia…
en español abandonar, desertar…
en portugués deserto…
en alemán verlassen, fahnenflüchtig werden…
en catalán desert…
en japonés 砂漠…
en chino (simplificado) 沙漠,荒漠…
(Definition of desert from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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