Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

El diccionario y el tesauro de inglés online más consultados por estudiantes de inglés.

Definición de “dream” en inglés

dream

noun [C] uk   /driːm/ us  

dream noun [C] (SLEEP)

A2 a series of events or images that happen in your mind when you are sleeping: a good/bad dream a recurring dream I had a very odd dream about you last night. [+ that] Paul had a dream that he won the lottery.

dream noun [C] (HOPE)

B1 something that you want to happen very much but that is not very likely: It's always been my dream to have flying lessons. Winning all that money was a dream come true. of your dreams the best that you can imagine: Win the house of your dreams in our fantastic competition!

dream

adjective uk   /driːm/ us  
dream holiday, house, job, etc. the perfect holiday, house, job, etc., that you want more than any other

dream

verb uk   /driːm/ (dreamed or dreamt, dreamed or dreamt) us  

dream verb (SLEEP)

A2 [I or T] to experience events and images in your mind while you are sleeping: What did you dream about last night? I often dream about/of flying. [+ that] I dreamed that I was having a baby. [I or T] mainly UK to imagine that you have heard, done, or seen something when you have not: Did you say that you were going tonight or did I dream it? I thought I'd bought some polish and it seems I haven't - I must have been dreaming.

dream verb (HOPE)

B1 [I] to imagine something that you would like to happen: I dream of living on a tropical island. [+ that] He never dreamed that one day he would become president. dream on informal used to tell someone that what they are hoping for is not likely to happen or to be true: "Watch. All I have to do is wink at her, and she'll come over here." "Dream on, Dave!"
(Definition of dream from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
Más sobre la pronunciación de dream
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definiciones de “dream” en otros diccionarios

Palabra del día

bright spark

a person who is intelligent, and full of energy and enthusiasm

Palabra del día

Highly delighted, bitterly disappointed, ridiculously cheap: adverbs for emphasis.

by Liz Walter,
October 22, 2014
We often make adjectives stronger by putting an adverb in front of them. The most common ones are very and, for a stronger meaning, extremely: He was very pleased. The ship is extremely large. However, we don’t use very or extremely for adjectives that already have a strong meaning, for example fantastic,

Aprende más 

life tracking noun

October 20, 2014
the use of one or more devices or apps to monitor health, exercise, how time is spent, etc.

Aprende más