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Definición de “enter” en inglés

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enter

verb uk   /ˈen.tər/ us    /-t̬ɚ/

enter verb (PLACE)

A2 [I or T] to come or go into a particular place: The police entered (the building) through/by the side door. You will begin to feel sleepy as the drug enters the bloodstream.
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enter verb (COMPETITION)

B1 [I or T] to be included in a competition, race, or exam, or to arrange for someone else to do this: Both men have been entered for/in the 100 metres in Paris next month. All three companies have entered the race to develop a new system. Are you going to enter the photography competition?
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enter verb (INFORMATION)

B1 [T] to put information into a computer, book, or document: You have to enter a password to access the database. [T] formal to make a particular type of statement officially: The prisoner entered a plea of not guilty.
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enter verb (ORGANIZATION)

[T] to become a member of a particular organization, or to start working in a particular type of job: Ms Doughty entered politics/Parliament after a career in banking.
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enter verb (PERIOD)

C1 [T] to begin a period of time: The project is entering its final stages. The violence is now entering its third week.

enter

noun [S] uk   /ˈen.tər/ us    /-t̬ɚ/
the key on a computer keyboard that is used to say that the words or numbers on the screen are correct, or to say that an instruction should be performed, or to move down a line on the screen: Move the cursor to where it says "New File" and press enter.
(Definition of enter from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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