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Definición de “escort” en inglés

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escort

verb [T] uk   /ɪˈskɔːt/ us    /-kɔːrt/

escort verb [T] (GO WITH)

to go with a person or vehicle, especially to make certain that he, she, or it leaves or arrives safely: Several little boats escorted the sailing ship into the harbour. Security guards escorted the intruders from the building. The police escorted her to the airport, and made sure that she left the country. to go with someone and show them a place: People on the tour will be escorted by an expert on archaeology.

escort verb [T] (AS SOCIAL COMPANION)

formal to go to a social event with someone, especially a person of the opposite sex: Who will be escorting her to the ball?

escort

noun uk   /ˈes.kɔːt/ us    /-kɔːrt/

escort noun (SOCIAL COMPANION)

[C] a person who goes with another person as a partner to a social event: "But I can't go to the dance without an escort," she protested. [C] someone who is paid to go out to social events with another person, and sometimes to have sex: He hired an escort to go to the dinner with him.

escort noun (GUARD)

[C] a person or vehicle that goes somewhere with someone to protect or guard them: The members of the jury left the court with a police escort. [U] the state of having someone with you who gives you protection or guards you: The prisoners were transported under military escort.
(Definition of escort from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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