Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

El diccionario y el tesauro de inglés online más consultados por estudiantes de inglés.

Definición de “fake” en inglés

See all translations

fake

noun [C] uk   /feɪk/ us  
C2 an object that is made to look real or valuable in order to deceive people: Experts revealed that the painting was a fake. The gun in his hand was a fake.C2 someone who is not what or who they claim to be: After working for ten years as a doctor, he was exposed as a fake.

fake

adjective uk   /feɪk/ us  
C1 not real, but made to look or seem real: He was charged with possessing a fake passport. fake fur/blood disapproving showing or pretending to feel emotions that are not sincere: a fake smile/laugh She's so fake, pretending to be everybody's friend.

fake

verb uk   /feɪk/ us  

fake verb (FEELING/ILLNESS)

C2 [I or T] to pretend that you have a feeling or illness: to fake surprise to fake an orgasm She didn't want to go out, so she faked a headache. He faked a heart attack and persuaded prison staff to take him to hospital. He isn't really crying, he's just faking.

fake verb (OBJECT)

C2 [T] to make an object look real or valuable in order to deceive people: to fake a document/signature
faker
noun [C] uk   /ˈfeɪ.kər/ us    /-kɚ/
Traducciones de “fake”
en coreano 가짜의…
en árabe مُزيّف…
en francés faux, imposteur…
en turco sahte, taklit…
en italiano falso…
en chino (tradicionál) 贗品, 假貨, 冒充者…
en ruso фальшивый, искусственный…
en polaco sztuczny, fałszywy…
en español falsificación, impostor…
en portugués falso…
en alemán die Fälschung, der Schwindler…
en catalán fals…
en japonés にせものの…
en chino (simplificado) 赝品, 假货, 冒充者…
(Definition of fake from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
Más sobre la pronunciación de fake
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Más definiciones de “fake” en inglés

Definiciones de “fake” en otros diccionarios

Palabra del día

sail

When a boat or a ship sails, it travels on the water.

Palabra del día

Byronic, Orwellian and Darwinian: adjectives from names.

by Liz Walter,
April 15, 2015
Becoming an adjective is a strange kind of memorial, but it is often a sign of a person having had real influence on the world. Science is full of examples, from Hippocrates, the Greek medic born around 460 BC, who gave his name to the Hippocratic Oath still used by doctors today,

Aprende más 

dumbwalking noun

April 20, 2015
walking slowly, without paying attention to the world around you because you are consulting a smartphone He told me dumbwalking probably wouldn’t be a long-term problem.

Aprende más