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Definición de “false” en inglés

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false

adjective uk   /fɒls/ us    /fɑːls/

false adjective (NOT REAL)

B2 not real, but made to look or seem real: false eyelashes/teeth UK Modern office buildings have false floors, under which computer and phone wires can be laid.
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false adjective (NOT TRUE)

B1 disapproving not true, but made to seem true in order to deceive people: She was charged with giving false evidence in court. When she was stopped by the police for speeding, she gave them a false name and address. He assumed a false identity (= pretended he was someone else) in order to escape from the police.under false pretences disapproving If you do something under false pretences, you lie about who you are, what you are doing, or what you intend to do, in order to get something: He was deported for entering the country under false pretences. If you're not going to offer me a job, then you've brought me here under false pretences (= you have deceived me in order to make me come here).
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false adjective (NOT CORRECT)

B1 not correct: "Three plus three is seven. True or false?" "False." The news report about the explosion turned out to be false. You'll get a false impression/idea of the town if you only visit the university.
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false adjective (NOT SINCERE)

C1 disapproving not sincere or expressing real emotions: a false smile/laugh I didn't like her - she seemed false.
Synonym

false adjective (NOT LOYAL)

literary disapproving A false friend is not loyal or cannot be trusted.
(Definition of false from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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Definiciones de “false” en otros diccionarios

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illusion

an idea or belief that is not true

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Lies, lies, lies!

by Kate Woodford,
February 25, 2015
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