feel - definición en el diccionario inglés británico y tesauro - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Definición de “feel” en inglés

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feel

verb uk   us   /fiːl/ (felt, felt)

feel verb (EXPERIENCE)

A1 [L or T] to experience something physical or emotional: "How are you feeling?" "Not too bad, but I've still got a slight headache." How would you feel about moving to a different city? He's still feeling a little weak after his operation. My eyes feel really sore. I never feel safe when Richard is driving. Never in her life had she felt so happy. My suitcase began to feel really heavy after a while. I felt like (= thought that I was) a complete idiot/such a fool. She felt his hot breath on her neck. [+ obj + -ing verb ] I could feel the sweat trickling down my back. By midday, we were really feeling (= suffering from) the heat.feel like sth B1 to have a wish for something, or to want to do something, at a particular moment: I feel like (going for) a swim. I feel like (having) a nice cool glass of lemonade. "Are you coming to aerobics?" "No, I don't feel like it today." [+ -ing verb] to want to do something that you do not do: He was so rude I felt like slapping his face.feel the cold to get cold quicker and more often than most people: As you get older, you tend to feel the cold more.not feel a thing informal to not feel any pain: "Did it hurt?" "Not at all - I didn't feel a thing."
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feel verb (OPINION)

B1 [I or T] to have a particular opinion about or attitude towards something: [+ (that)] I feel (that) I should be doing more to help her. [(+ to be) + adj] He had always felt himself (to be) inferior to his brothers. Do you feel very strongly (= have strong opinions) about this? I feel certain I'm right.
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feel verb (TOUCH)

B2 [I or T] to touch something in order to discover something about it: [+ question word] Just feel how cold my hands are! He gently felt the softness of the baby's cheek. I was feeling (around) (= searching with my hand) in my bag for the keys.
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feel

noun uk   us   /fiːl/

feel noun (TOUCH)

[S] the way that something feels: She loved the feel of silk against her skin. [C] mainly UK informal the action of touching something: Is that shirt silk? Ooh, let me have a feel!

feel noun (CHARACTER)

[S] (also feeling) the character of a place or situation: I like the decoration - it's got a Spanish feel to it. There was a feel of mystery about the place. We were there for such a short time, we didn't really get the feel of (= get to know) the place.

feel noun (UNDERSTANDING)

a feel for sth (also feeling) a natural understanding or ability, especially in a subject or activity: She has a real feel for language. I tried learning the piano, but I never had much of a feel for it.get the feel of sth (also feeling) to learn how to do something, usually a new activity: Once you get the feel of it, using a mouse is easy.
(Definition of feel from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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