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Definición de “flare” en inglés

flare

verb uk   /fleər/ us    /fler/

flare verb (BURN BRIGHTLY)

[I] to burn brightly either for a short time or not regularly: The flame above the oil well flared (up) into the dark sky.

flare verb (GET WORSE)

[I] (also flare up) When something bad such as violence, pain, or anger flares (up), it suddenly starts or gets much worse: Violence flared up again last night. Tempers flared after a three-hour delay at Gatwick Airport yesterday.

flare verb (MAKE WIDER)

[I or T] to (cause to) become wider: The horse's nostrils flared. He flared his nostrils in rage. The skirt fits tightly over the hips and flares just below the knees.

flare

noun uk   /fleər/ us    /fler/

flare noun (BRIGHTNESS)

[C] a sudden increase in the brightness of a fire: There was a sudden flare when she threw the petrol onto the fire. [C] a very bright light or coloured smoke that can be used as a signal, or a device that produces this: We set off a flare to help guide our rescuers.

flare noun (CLOTHES)

flares [plural] UK trousers that get wider below the knee [C usually singular] the fact of something, especially clothing, becoming wider at one end: This skirt has a definite flare.
(Definition of flare from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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