fuss - definición en el diccionario inglés británico y tesauro - Cambridge Dictionaries Online
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Definición de “fuss” en inglés

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fussnoun

uk   us   /fʌs/

fuss noun (TOO MUCH OF A FEELING)

C1 [S or U] a show of anger, worry, or excitement that is unnecessary or greater than the situation deserves: She made such a fuss when Richard spilled a drop of wine on her blouse! It's all a fuss about nothing. I don't see what the fuss is about - he seems like a fairly ordinary looking guy to me. We tried to arrange a ceremony with as little fuss as possible.make a fuss of/over sb to give someone a lot of attention and treat them well: She doesn't see her grandchildren very often so she makes a real fuss of them when she does.
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fuss noun (ATTENTION)

[U] attention given to small matters that are not important: The article was entitled "Making up with the minimum of fuss: a five-minute beauty routine that every busy woman should know".

fussverb

uk   us   /fʌs/

fuss verb (GIVE ATTENTION TO)

[I] to give too much attention to small matters that are not important, usually in a way that shows that you are worried and not relaxed: Please, stop fussing - the food's cooking and there's nothing more to do until the guests arrive. It irritates me the way she's always fussing with her hair!

fuss verb (MAKE NERVOUS/ANGRY)

[T] US to make someone nervous and angry by trying to get their attention when they are very busy: Don't fuss me, honey, I've got a whole pile of work to do.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of fuss from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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