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Definición de “go into sth” en inglés

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go into sth

verb uk phrasal verb with go   /ɡəʊ/ us    /ɡoʊ/ ( present participle going, past tense went, past participle gone)

(START)

C1 to start doing a particular type of work: My son's planning to go into journalism. She's decided to go into business as a freelance computer programmer. to start an activity, or start to be in a particular state or condition: The drug is still being tested and will not go into commercial production for at least two years. How many companies have gone into liquidation/receivership during the current recession? Repeated death threats have forced them to go into hiding. Her baby was born three hours after she went into labour. Some of the fans seemed to go into a trance when she appeared on stage.
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(DISCUSS)

C2 to discuss, examine, describe, or explain something in a detailed or careful way: This is the first book to go into her personal life as well as her work. I'd rather not go into that now. Can we discuss it later? I'm unable to go into detail(s) at this stage because I still have very little information about how the accident happened.
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(BE USED)

C1 mainly UK If time, money, or effort goes into a product or activity, it is used when producing or doing it: A considerable amount of time and effort has gone into this exhibition.
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(HIT)

If a vehicle goes into something such as a tree or a wall, it hits it: Their car was travelling at 50 miles an hour when it went into the tree.
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(Definition of go into sth from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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“go into sth” in English

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