grow - definición en el diccionario inglés británico y tesauro - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Definición de “grow” en inglés

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grow

verb uk   /ɡrəʊ/  us   /ɡroʊ/ (grew, grown)

grow verb (INCREASE)

A2 [I or L or T] to increase in size or amount, or to become more advanced or developed: Children grow so quickly. This plant grows best in the shade. She's grown three centimetres this year. Football's popularity continues to grow. The labour force is expected to grow by two percent next year. The male deer grows large, branching horns called antlers.B1 [I or T] If your hair or nails grow, or if you grow them, they become longer: Lottie wants to grow her hair long. Are you growing a beard? Wow, your hair's grown!A2 [I] If a plant grows in a particular place, it exists and develops there: There were roses growing up against the wall.A2 [T] If you grow a plant, you put it in the ground and take care of it, usually in order to sell it: The villagers grow coffee and maize to sell in the market. [T] to make a business bigger by increasing sales, employing more people, etc.: We aim to grow the company by giving the customer a better deal.
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grow verb (BECOME)

grow tired, old, calm, etc.
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B2 to gradually become tired, old, calm, etc.: He grew bored of the countryside. Growing old is so awful.
grow to do sth to gradually start to do something: I've grown to like her over the months.
(Definition of grow from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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