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Definición de “head” en inglés

head

noun uk   /hed/ us  

head noun (BODY PART)

A1 [C] the part of the body above the neck where the eyes, nose, mouth, ears, and brain are: Put this hat on to keep your head warm. He banged his head on the car as he was getting in. She nodded/shook her head (= showed her agreement/disagreement). [S] a person or animal when considered as a unit: Dinner will cost £20 a/per head (= for each person). I did a quick head count (= calculated how many people there were). They own a hundred head of (= 100) cattle. [S] a measure of length or height equal to the size of a head: Her horse won by a head. Paul is a head taller than Andrew.

head noun (MIND)

B1 [C] the mind and mental abilities: You need a clear head to be able to drive safely. What put that (idea) into your head? (= What made you think that?) I can't get that tune/that man out of my head (= I cannot stop hearing the tune in my mind/thinking about that man). Use your head (= think more carefully)! Harriet has a (good) head for figures (= she is very good at calculating numbers).UK Do you have a head for heights (= are you able to be in high places without fear)?

head noun (LEADER)

B1 [C] someone in charge of or leading an organization, group, etc.: the head of the History department the head chef A2 [C] mainly UK a headteacher head boy/girl mainly UK a boy or girl who is the leader of the other prefects and often represents his or her school on formal occasions

head noun (TOP PART)

C2 [S] the top part or beginning of something: the head of the queue the head of the page Diana, the guest of honour, sat at the head of the table (= the most important end of it). [C] the larger end of a nail, hammer, etc. [C] the top part of a plant where a flower or leaves grow: a head of lettuce [C] the layer of white bubbles on top of beer after it has been poured [C] the upper part of a river, where it begins [C] the top part of a spot when it contains pus (= yellow liquid)

head noun (COIN SIDE)

heads [U] the side of a coin that has a picture of someone's head on it
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head noun (DEVICE)

[C] the part of a tape or video recorder (= machine for recording sound or pictures) that touches the tape to record and play music, speech, etc.

head noun (GRAMMAR)

specialized language [C] the main part of the phrase, to which the other parts are related
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head

verb uk   /hed/ us  

head verb (GO)

B2 [I + adv/prep] to go in a particular direction: I was heading out of the room when she called me back. We were heading towards Kumasi when our truck broke down. He headed straight for (= went towards) the fridge. I think we ought to head back/home (= return to where we started) now, before it gets too dark.

head verb (LEADER)

B2 [T] to be in charge of a group or organization: She heads one of Britain's leading travel firms. Judge Hawthorne was chosen to head the team investigating the allegations of abuse.

head verb (TOP PART)

C1 [T] to be at the front or top of something: The Queen's carriage headed the procession. Jo's name headed the list of candidates.

head verb (SPORT)

[T] to hit a ball with your head: Owen headed the ball into the back of the net.
(Definition of head noun, verb from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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