Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

El diccionario y el tesauro de inglés online más consultados por estudiantes de inglés.

Definición de “imagination” en inglés

See all translations

imagination

noun uk   /ɪˌmædʒ.ɪˈneɪ.ʃən/ us  
B1 [C or U] the ability to form pictures in the mind: My younger son has a very vivid (= active) imagination. I can never make up stories - I have absolutely no imagination. For some reason the story captured/caught the imagination of the public (= made them very interested). It couldn't by any stretch of the imagination be described as a (= it is certainly not a) beautiful city. There's a sex scene in the film which apparently leaves nothing to the imagination (= shows sexual parts of the body very clearly). [U] something that you think exists or is true, although in fact it is not real or true: Was she paying him a lot of attention or was it just my imagination? Is it my imagination or is David behaving strangely at the moment?B1 [U] the ability to think of new ideas: It's a job that needs someone with a bit of imagination.
More examples
Traducciones de “imagination”
en coreano 상상, 상상력…
en árabe تَخَيُّل, خَيال…
en portugués imaginação…
en catalán imaginació…
en japonés 想像力, 想像…
en italiano immaginazione…
en chino (tradicionál) 想像力, 幻覺, 幻想…
en ruso воображение…
en turco hayal, zihin, kafa…
en chino (simplificado) 想象力, 幻觉, 幻想…
en polaco wyobraźnia…
(Definition of imagination from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
Más sobre la pronunciación de imagination
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definiciones de “imagination” en otros diccionarios

Palabra del día

sail

When a boat or a ship sails, it travels on the water.

Palabra del día

Byronic, Orwellian and Darwinian: adjectives from names.

by Liz Walter,
April 15, 2015
Becoming an adjective is a strange kind of memorial, but it is often a sign of a person having had real influence on the world. Science is full of examples, from Hippocrates, the Greek medic born around 460 BC, who gave his name to the Hippocratic Oath still used by doctors today,

Aprende más 

dumbwalking noun

April 20, 2015
walking slowly, without paying attention to the world around you because you are consulting a smartphone He told me dumbwalking probably wouldn’t be a long-term problem.

Aprende más