Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

El diccionario y el tesauro de inglés online más consultados por estudiantes de inglés.

Definición de “into” en inglés

into

preposition uk   /ˈɪn.tuː/ us  

into preposition (INSIDE)

A1 to the inside or middle of a place, container, area, etc.: Would you put the jar back into the cupboard for me, please? Let's go into the garden. Stop running around and get into bed! I can't get into these trousers any more. They're far too small for me.

into preposition (CHANGE)

A2 used to show when a person or thing is changing from one form or condition to another: Peel the cucumber and chop it into small cubes. There was a series of explosions and the van burst into flames (= started to burn violently). Her novels have been translated into 19 languages. We're planning to turn the smallest bedroom into an office.

into preposition (TOUCHING FORCEFULLY)

B1 used to show movement that involves something touching something else with a lot of force but without moving inside it: He's always walking into things when he hasn't got his glasses on.

into preposition (TOWARDS)

B1 in the direction of something or someone: She was looking straight into his eyes.

into preposition (ABOUT)

involving or about something: an inquiry into the cause of the accident

into preposition (DIVISION)

used when referring to the division of one number by another number: What's 5 into 125?

into preposition (INTERESTED)

B1 enthusiastic about or interested in: Jackie's really into classical music.
(Definition of into from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
Más sobre la pronunciación de into
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definiciones de “into” en otros diccionarios

Palabra del día

yo

used as an informal greeting between people who know each other or as an expression of approval

Palabra del día

Come on – you can do it! Phrasal verbs with ‘come’.

by Liz Walter​,
November 19, 2014
As part of an occasional series on the tricky subject of phrasal verbs, this blog looks at ones formed with the verb ‘come’. If you are reading this blog, I’m sure you already know come from, as it is one of the first things you learn in class: I come from Scotland/Spain.

Aprende más 

silver splicer noun

November 17, 2014
informal a person who marries in later life Newly retired and now newlywed – rise of the ‘silver splicers’ Reaching pension age becomes a trigger to tie the knot as baby-boomers begin to redefine retirement

Aprende más