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Definición de “local” en inglés

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local

adjective uk   /ˈləʊ.kəl/ us    /ˈloʊ-/
B1 from, existing in, serving, or responsible for a small area, especially of a country: a local accent local issues a local newspaper/radio station Most of the local population depend on fishing for their income. Our children all go to the local school. Many local shops will be forced to close if the new supermarket is built. limited to a particular part of the body: a local anaesthetic local swelling
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local

noun [C] uk   /ˈləʊ.kəl/ us    /ˈloʊ-/

local noun [C] (PERSON)

C2 a person who lives in the particular small area that you are talking about: The café is popular with both locals and visitors.

local noun [C] (PUB)

UK a pub near to where a person lives, especially if they often go there to drink: The George is my local.

local noun [C] (VEHICLE)

US a train or bus that makes all or most of the stops along its route, allowing passengers to get on or off: the 12.24 local to Poughkeepsie

local noun [C] (ORGANIZATION)

US a division within a union representing people from a particular area
Traducciones de “local”
en coreano 현지의…
en árabe مَحَلّي…
en francés local, du quartier…
en turco yöresel, bölgesel, mahallî…
en italiano locale…
en chino (tradicionál) 當地的,本地的, 局部的,部分的…
en ruso местный…
en polaco miejscowy…
en español local, del barrio, de la zona…
en portugués local, de bairro…
en alemán Orts-……
en catalán local, del barri…
en japonés 地元の…
en chino (simplificado) 当地的,本地的, 局部的,部分的…
(Definition of local from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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