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Definición de “manoeuvre” en inglés

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manoeuvre

noun uk UK ( US maneuver)   /məˈnuː.vər/ us    /-vɚ/

manoeuvre noun (MOVEMENT)

[C] a movement or set of movements needing skill and care: Reversing round a corner is one of the manoeuvres you are required to perform in a driving test.

manoeuvre noun (MILITARY OPERATION)

[C usually plural] a planned and controlled movement or operation by the armed forces for training purposes and in war: military/naval manoeuvres We saw the army on manoeuvres in the mountains.

manoeuvre noun (CLEVER ACTION)

[C] a cleverly planned action that is intended to get an advantage: A series of impressive manoeuvres by the chairman had secured a lucrative contract for the company.

manoeuvre

verb uk UK ( US maneuver)   /məˈnuː.vər/ us    /-vɚ/

manoeuvre verb (MOVE)

[I or T] to turn and direct an object: Loaded supermarket trolleys are often difficult to manoeuvre. This car manoeuvres well at high speed.

manoeuvre verb (MAKE SB DO STH)

[T] to try to make someone act in a particular way: The other directors are trying to manoeuvre her into resigning.
Traducciones de “manoeuvre”
en español maniobra, estratagema…
en francés manœuvre…
en alemán das Manöver, der Schachzug…
en chino (tradicionál) 動作, 精巧動作…
en ruso маневр, интрига…
en turco manevra, hile, dolap…
en chino (simplificado) 动作, 精巧动作…
en polaco manewr…
(Definition of manoeuvre from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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