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Definición de “narrow” en inglés

narrow

adjective uk   /ˈnær.əʊ/ us    /-oʊ/

narrow adjective (SMALL WIDTH)

B1 having a small distance from one side to the other, especially in comparison with the length: a narrow bridge/passage/gap a narrow face narrow feet The little village has very narrow streets.

narrow adjective (LIMITED)

C2 mainly disapproving limited to a small area of interest, activity, or thought: They are unable to see beyond the narrow world of the theatre. It was regarded as a very narrow interpretation of the law.
See also

narrow adjective (ONLY JUST)

A narrow result is one that could easily have been different because the amount by which someone failed or succeeded was very small: The election was won by the very narrow margin of only 185 votes. The opposition had a narrow defeat. We won a narrow victory. a narrow escape C2 a situation in which you only just avoid danger: We got out in time but it was a narrow escape.
narrowness
noun [U] uk   /-nəs/ us  

narrow

verb uk   /ˈnær.əʊ/ us    /-oʊ/

narrow verb (LESS WIDE)

C1 [I or T] to become less wide or to make something less wide: The road narrows after the bridge. He narrowed his eyes in suspicion. They have narrowed the focus of the investigation, to concentrate on younger adults.figurative We must strive to narrow the gap between rich and poor.

narrow verb (LESS)

C2 [I] to become less: The retailer's loss narrowed to $3 million from $10 million a year earlier.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of narrow from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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