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Definición de “pace” en inglés

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pace

noun uk   /peɪs/ us  

pace noun (SPEED)

B2 [U] the speed at which someone or something moves, or with which something happens or changes: a slow/fast pace When she thought she heard someone following her, she quickened her pace. Could you slow down a bit - I can't keep pace with (= walk or run as fast as) you. For many years this company has set the pace (= has been the most successful company) in the communications industry. These changes seem to me to be happening at too fast a pace. I don't like the pace of modern life.
See also
force the pace to make other people in a race go faster by going faster yourself [U] the ability of a football player or team to move quickly with the ball: He plays on the right wing and has pace as well as skill. Chelsea lacked pace up front.
More examples

pace noun (STEP)

[C] a single step, or the distance you move when you take a single step: Take two paces forward/backwards. The runner collapsed just a few paces from the finish.

pace

verb uk   /peɪs/ us  

pace verb (SPEED)

[T] to get someone to run a race at a particular speed, for example by running with thempace yourself C2 to be careful not to do something too quickly so that you do not get too tired to finish it: No more soup, thank you. I'm pacing myself so that I have room for a dessert.

pace verb (STEP)

C2 [I + adv/prep, T] to walk with regular steps in one direction and then back again, usually because you are worried or nervous: He paced the room nervously. He paced up and down, waiting for the doctor to call.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of pace from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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