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Definición de “party” en inglés

party

noun uk   /ˈpɑː.ti/ us    /ˈpɑːr.t̬i/

party noun (CELEBRATION)

A1 [C] a social event where a group of people meet to talk, eat, drink, dance, etc., often in order to celebrate a special occasion: a birthday party a farewell party a dinner party (= a small, sometimes formal party where a meal is eaten) a fancy-dress (US costume) party (= a party where people wear clothes that make them look like someone or something else) Peter has/gives/throws really wild parties.

party noun (POLITICAL GROUP)

B1 [C, + sing/pl verb] an organization of people with particular political beliefs that competes in elections to try to win positions in local or national government: the Democratic Party the Green party the Conservative party The party has/have just elected a new leader. He was elected as party leader in 2001. They contacted party members from across the nation to ask for their support.

party noun (VISITING GROUP)

[C, + sing/pl verb] a group of people who are involved in an activity together, especially a visit: a party of tourists Most museums give a discount to school parties.

party noun (INVOLVEMENT)

[C] one of the people or groups of people involved in an official argument, arrangement, or similar situation: The UN called on all parties in the conflict to take a positive stance towards the new peace initiative. It's often difficult to establish who the guilty party is following a road accident.

party

verb [I] uk   /ˈpɑː.ti/ us    /ˈpɑːr.t̬i/
to enjoy yourself by drinking and dancing, especially at a party: Let's party! They partied till dawn.
(Definition of party from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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