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Definición de “pile” en inglés

pile

noun uk   /paɪl/ us  

pile noun (AMOUNT)

B1 [C] objects positioned one on top of another: a pile of books a pile of dirty clothes B1 [C] a mass of something that has been placed somewhere: a large pile of sand a pile of sth/piles of sth informal a lot of something: I've got piles/a pile of things to do today.

pile noun (COLUMN)

[C] a strong column or post of wood, metal, or concrete that is pushed into the ground to help support a building

pile noun (SURFACE)

[S] the soft surface made by the ends of many short threads on a carpet or on cloth such as velvet: a luxurious deep-pile carpet

pile noun (BUILDING)

[C] mainly humorous a large building: They've got a great big Victorian pile somewhere out in the country.

pile noun (MEDICAL)

piles [plural] informal → haemorrhoids

pile

verb uk   /paɪl/ us  

pile verb (OBJECTS)

[I or T, + adv/prep] (also pile up) to arrange objects into a pile: We piled plenty of logs up next to the fire. Please pile your homework books neatly on the table as you leave. Her plate was piled (high) with salad. Snow had piled up against the walls.

pile verb (PEOPLE)

[I usually + adv/prep] informal (of a group of people) to move together, especially in an uncontrolled way: As soon as the train stopped, they all piled in/out.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of pile from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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