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Definición de “please” en inglés

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please

exclamation uk   /pliːz/ us  
A1 used to make a request more polite: Could I have two coffees and a tea, please? Please remember to close the windows before you leave. used to add force to a request or demand: Please, David, put the knife down. Oh, please. Do shut up! UK used especially by children to a teacher or other adult in order to get their attention: Please, Miss, I know the answer!A1 used when accepting something politely or enthusiastically: "More potatoes?" "Please." "May I bring my husband?" "Please do." mainly UK "Oh, yes please," shouted the children.
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please

verb uk   /pliːz/ us  
B1 [I or T] to make someone feel happy or satisfied, or to give someone pleasure: I only got married to please my parents. He was always a good boy, very friendly and eager to please. [+ obj + to infinitive ] It always pleases me to see a well-designed book!C2 [I] to want, like, or choose, when used with words such as "whatever", "whoever", and "anywhere": She thinks she can just do whatever/as she pleases. I shall go out with whoever I please.if you please formal used to express surprise and anger: They want £200, if you please, just to replace a couple of broken windows! old-fashioned or formal used to make a request more polite: Take your seats, ladies and gentlemen, if you please.
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(Definition of please from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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