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Definición de “plus” en inglés

plus

preposition uk   /plʌs/ us  
A2 added to: What is six plus four? The rent will be £75 a week, plus (= added to the cost of) gas and electricity.

plus

preposition, conjunction uk   /plʌs/ us  
B1 and also: There will be two adults travelling, plus three children.informal Let's not go on holiday in August - it'll be too hot - plus it'll be more expensive.

plus

noun [C] uk   /plʌs/ us  

plus noun [C] (ADVANTAGE)

B2 (plural pluses or plusses) informal an advantage or a good feature: Your teaching experience will be a plus in this job.

plus noun [C] (ADDITION SIGN)

(also plus sign) the (+) sign, written between two numbers to show that they should be added together

plus

adjective uk   /plʌs/ us  

plus adjective (ADDITION)

[before noun] describes a stated number or amount more than zero: Plus 8 is eight more than zero. The temperature is expected to be no more than plus two (degrees). [after noun] more than the number or amount mentioned: temperatures of 40 plus Those cars cost £15,000 plus. [after noun] used by teachers after a letter, such as B or C, to show that the standard of a piece of work is slightly higher than the stated mark: I got C plus/C+ for my essay.

plus adjective (ADVANTAGE)

[before noun] informal describing an advantage: The house is near the sea, which is a plus factor for us.UK The fact that the flight goes from our nearest airport is a real plus point.
(Definition of plus from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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