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Definición de “prompt” en inglés

prompt

verb [T] uk   /prɒmpt/ us    /prɑːmpt/

prompt verb [T] (CAUSE)

to make something happen: The bishop's speech has prompted an angry response from both political parties. Recent worries over the president's health have prompted speculation over his political future. prompt sb to do sth C2 to make someone decide to say or do something: What prompted you to say that? I don't know what prompted him to leave.

prompt verb [T] (HELP REMEMBER)

to help someone, especially an actor, to remember what they were going to say or do: I forgot my line and had to be prompted.

prompt

adjective uk   /prɒmpt/ us    /prɑːmpt/
B2 (of an action) done quickly and without delay, or (of a person) acting quickly or arriving at the arranged time: They've written back already - that was a very prompt reply. They're usually fairly prompt in dealing with enquiries. Try to be prompt because we'll be very short of time.

prompt

noun [C] uk   /prɒmpt/ us    /prɑːmpt/

prompt noun [C] (COMPUTER)

a sign on a computer screen that shows that the computer is ready to receive your instructions

prompt noun [C] (ACTOR'S HELP)

words that are spoken to an actor who has forgotten what he or she is going to say during the performance of a play (also prompter,   /ˈprɒmptər/    /ˈprɑːmptɚ/) a person whose job is to help actors, during a performance, to remember words that they have forgotten

prompt

adverb uk   /prɒmpt/ us    /prɑːmpt/
at the time stated and no later: We'll be leaving at six o'clock prompt.
(Definition of prompt from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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