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Definición de “prospect” en inglés

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prospect

noun uk   /ˈprɒs.pekt/ us    /ˈprɑː.spekt/

prospect noun (POSSIBILITY)

B2 [C or U] the possibility that something good might happen in the future: Is there any prospect of the weather improving? There seems little prospect of an end to the dispute. [+ that] There's not much prospect that this war will be over soon. There's every prospect of success.prospects B2 [plural] the possibility of being successful, especially at work: She's hoping the course will improve her career prospects. Prospects of/for (= opportunities for) employment remain bleak for most people in the area.C2 [S] the idea of something that will or might happen in the future: The prospect of spending three whole days with her fills me with horror. I'm very excited at the prospect of seeing her again. We face the prospect of having to start all over again. [C] a person who might be chosen, for example as an employee: We'll be interviewing four more prospects for the posts this afternoon.
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prospect noun (VIEW)

[C] formal a good view of a large land area or of a city: From the restaurant there was a marvellous prospect of/over Siena and the countryside beyond.

prospect

verb [I] uk   /ˈprɒs.pekt/ us    /ˈprɑː.spekt/
to search for gold, oil, or other valuable substances on or under the surface of the earth: to prospect for oil/gold
prospector
noun [C] uk   /prəˈspek.tər/ us    /-t̬ɚ/
a prospector looking for gold
(Definition of prospect from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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