represent - definición en el diccionario inglés británico y tesauro - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Definición de “represent” en inglés

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represent

verb uk   us   /ˌrep.rɪˈzent/

represent verb (ACT FOR)

C2 [T] to speak, act, or be present officially for another person or people: They chose a famous barrister to represent them in court. Union officials representing the teachers met the government today. I sent my husband to represent me at the funeral. Women were well/poorly represented at the conference (= there were many/few present). [T] to be the Member of Parliament, or of Congress, etc. for a particular area: Ed Smythe represents Barnet.C2 [T] to be the person from a country, school, etc. that is in a competition: She was chosen to represent France at the Olympics. formal to express or complain about something, to a person in authority: We represented our grievances/demands to the boss.
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represent verb (DESCRIBE)

C2 [T] to show or describe something or someone: [+ -ing verb] The statue represents St. George killing the dragon. This new report represents the current situation in our schools. He represents himself as an expert, but he knows nothing.B2 [T] to be a sign or symbol of something: To many people the White House represents the identity of the United States.
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represent verb (BE)

B2 [L only + noun] to be the result of something, or to be something: This book represents ten years of thought and research. The new offer represented an increase of ten percent on the previous one.
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(Definition of represent from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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