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Definición de “sensitive” en inglés

sensitive

adjective uk   /ˈsen.sɪ.tɪv/ us    /-sə.t̬ɪv/

sensitive adjective (UPSET)

B2 easily upset by the things people say or do, or causing people to be upset, embarrassed, or angry: Her reply showed that she was very sensitive to criticism. He was very sensitive about his scar and thought everyone was staring at him. B2 A sensitive subject, situation, etc. needs to be dealt with carefully in order to avoid upsetting people: Sex education and birth control are sensitive issues. The stolen car contained military documents described as very sensitive.

sensitive adjective (KIND)

B2 understanding what other people need, and being helpful and kind to them: Representatives of the company claim their plan will be sensitive to local needs. In the movie, he plays a concerned and sensitive father trying to bring up two teenage children on his own.

sensitive adjective (REACTING EASILY)

B2 easily influenced, changed, or damaged, especially by a physical activity or effect: Some people's teeth are highly sensitive to cold. sensitive skin B2 Sensitive equipment is able to record small changes: The patient's responses are recorded on a sensitive piece of equipment which gives extremely accurate readings.
-sensitive
suffix uk   /-sen.sɪ.tɪv/ us    /-sə.t̬ɪv/
light-/heat-sensitive
sensitively
adverb uk   /-li/ us  
This is a very delicate situation and it needs to be handled sensitively.
sensitiveness
noun [U] uk   /-nəs/ us  
(Definition of sensitive from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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