shield - definición en el diccionario inglés británico y tesauro - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Definición de “shield” en inglés

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shield

noun [C] uk   us   /ʃiːld/
C2 in the past, a large, flat object made of metal or leather that soldiers held in front of their bodies to protect themselves a large, flat object made of strong plastic that police officers hold in front of their bodies to protect themselves: The police held up their riot shields against the flying rocks and bricks. something or someone used as protection or providing protection: The anti-personnel mines were laid as a protective shield around the town. Anger can function as a shield against (= a way of avoiding) even more painful emotions of loss and hurt. a flat object with two straight sides, a rounded or pointed lower edge, and usually a straight top edge, on which there is a coat of arms an object shaped like a shield that is given as a prize or used as a symbol or badge : Our school won the county basketball shield this year.
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shield

verb [T] uk   us   /ʃiːld/
C1 to protect someone or something: She held her hand above her eyes to shield them from the sun. They are accused of trying to shield the General from US federal investigators. in football, to keep your body between an opponent and the ball, with your back to the other player, to prevent them from getting the ball: We teach young players how to step in front of the defender and use their body to shield the ball.
(Definition of shield from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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