Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

El diccionario y el tesauro de inglés online más consultados por estudiantes de inglés.

Definición de “slow” en inglés

slow

adjective uk   /sləʊ/ us    /sloʊ/

slow adjective (NOT FAST)

A1 moving, happening, or doing something without much speed: a slow runner/driver/reader She's a very slow eater. We're making slow but steady progress with the decorating. The government was very slow to react to the problem. Business is always slow during those months because everyone's on holiday.
Opposite

slow adjective (NOT EXCITING)

B2 describes a film, book, play, etc. that does not have much excitement and action: His films are so slow they send me to sleep.

slow adjective (NOT CLEVER)

A person might be described as slow if they are not very clever and do not understand or notice things quickly: I feel so slow when I'm with Andrew - he's so much brighter than me. I was a bit slow off the mark/on the uptake there - I didn't follow his reasoning at all.
See also

slow adjective (TIME)

If a clock or watch is slow, it shows a time that is earlier than the real time: That clock is ten minutes slow.

slow

verb [I or T] uk   /sləʊ/ us    /sloʊ/
C2 to reduce speed or activity, or to make something do this: Business development has slowed in response to the recession. Traffic slows to a crawl (= goes so slowly it almost stops) during rush hour. The pilot was asked to slow his approach to the runway.

slow

adverb uk   /sləʊ/ us    /sloʊ/
at a slow speed: I can't walk any slower. slow-moving traffic a slow-burning candlemainly US He drives too slow!
(Definition of slow from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
Más sobre la pronunciación de slow
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definiciones de “slow” en otros diccionarios

Palabra del día

wave

to raise your hand and move it from side to side as a way of greeting someone, telling someone to do something, or adding emphasis to an expression

Palabra del día

Come on – you can do it! Phrasal verbs with ‘come’.

by Liz Walter​,
November 19, 2014
As part of an occasional series on the tricky subject of phrasal verbs, this blog looks at ones formed with the verb ‘come’. If you are reading this blog, I’m sure you already know come from, as it is one of the first things you learn in class: I come from Scotland/Spain.

Aprende más 

silver splicer noun

November 17, 2014
informal a person who marries in later life Newly retired and now newlywed – rise of the ‘silver splicers’ Reaching pension age becomes a trigger to tie the knot as baby-boomers begin to redefine retirement

Aprende más