strip - definición en el diccionario inglés británico y tesauro - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Definición de “strip” en inglés

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strip

verb uk   us   /strɪp/ (-pp-)

strip verb (REMOVE COVER)

[T] to remove, pull, or tear the covering or outer layer from something: Because of the pollution, the trees are almost completely stripped of bark. The paintwork was so bad that we decided to strip off all the paint and start again. [+ adj] During the summer months, the sheep strip the mountains bare.

strip verb (REMOVE CLOTHING)

[I or T] (UK also strip off) to remove your clothing, or to remove all the clothing of someone else: UK Suddenly he stripped off and ran into the sea. It was so hot that we stripped off our shirts. [+ adj] He was interrogated, stripped naked and then beaten.

strip verb (REMOVE PARTS)

[T] to remove parts of a machine, vehicle, or engine in order to clean or repair it: I've decided to strip down my motorbike and rebuild it. [T] mainly US to remove the parts of a car, etc. in order to sell them

strip

noun uk   us   /strɪp/

strip noun (PIECE)

C1 [C] a long, flat, narrow piece: a narrow strip of land He didn't have a bandage, so he ripped up his shirt into thin strips. Protect the magnetic strip on your credit card from scratches, heat, or other damage.

strip noun (CLOTHING)

[C usually singular] UK the clothing worn by a football team that has the team's colours on it: The team will be wearing its new strip at next Saturday's match.

strip noun (REMOVE CLOTHING)

[S] an entertainment in which the performer removes all his or her clothing: He jumped up on the table and started to do a strip.
(Definition of strip from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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