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Definición de “study” en inglés

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study

verb uk   /ˈstʌd.i/ us  

study verb (LEARN)

A1 [I or T] to learn about a subject, especially in an educational course or by reading books: to study biology/chemistry Next term we shall study plants and how they grow. She's been studying for her doctorate for three years already.
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study verb (EXAMINE)

B2 [T] to examine something very carefully: I want time to study this contract thoroughly before signing it. [+ question word] Researchers have been studying how people under stress make decisions.
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Phrasal verbs

study

noun uk   /ˈstʌd.i/ us  

study noun (EXAMINING)

B2 [C] the activity of examining a subject in detail in order to discover new information: a five-year study of the relationship between wildlife and farming Some studies have suggested a link between certain types of artificial sweetener and cancer. [C] a drawing that an artist makes in order to test ideas before starting a painting of the same subject

study noun (LEARNING)

B2 [U] the act of learning about a subject, usually at school or university: the study of English literaturestudies A2 [plural] studying or work involving studying: Adam doesn't spend enough time on his studies. used in the names of some educational subjects and courses: the department of business/media studiesB1 [C] a room, especially in a house, used for quiet work such as reading or writing
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(Definition of study from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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