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Definición de “suspect” en inglés

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suspect

verb [T] uk   /səˈspekt/ us  

suspect verb [T] (THINK LIKELY)

B2 to think or believe something to be true or probable: So far, the police do not suspect foul play. [+ (that)] We had no reason to suspect (that) he might try to kill himself. "Do you think she'll have told them?" "I suspect not/so."
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suspect verb [T] (THINK GUILTY)

B2 to think that someone has committed a crime or done something wrong: No one knows who killed her, but the police suspect her husband. The police suspect him of carrying out two bomb attacks. Three suspected terrorists have been arrested.
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suspect verb [T] (DOUBT)

C2 to not trust; to doubt: I have no reason to suspect her honesty/loyalty. We suspected his motives in making his offer.
suspected
adjective uk   /-ˈspek.tɪd/ us  
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He has a suspected broken leg.

suspect

noun [C] uk   /ˈsʌs.pekt/ us  
B2 a person believed to have committed a crime or done something wrong, or something believed to have caused something bad: Police have issued a photograph of the suspect. The prime suspect in the case committed suicide. No one knows what caused the outbreak of food poisoning, but shellfish is the main suspect (= is thought to have caused it).

suspect

adjective uk   /ˈsʌs.pekt/ us  
possibly false or dangerous: The study was carried out with such a small sample that its results are suspect. A suspect parcel was found at the station.
(Definition of suspect from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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