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Definición de “sweat” en inglés

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sweat

noun uk   /swet/ us  

sweat noun (LIQUID)

B2 [U] the clear, salty liquid that you pass through your skin: The dancers were dripping with/pouring with sweat after a morning's rehearsal. By the time we'd climbed to the top of the hill, we were covered in sweat. She wiped the beads (= drops) of sweat from her forehead. figurative The cathedral was built by human toil and sweat (= effort).
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sweat noun (CLOTHES)

sweats [plural] US ( UK tracksuit) a loose top and trousers, worn either by people who are training for a sport or exercising, or as informal clothing

sweat

verb [I] uk   /swet/ us  
B2 to pass sweat through the skin because you are hot, ill, or frightened: It was so hot when we arrived in Tripoli that we started to sweat as soon as we got off the plane. The prisoners were sweating with fear. informal I was so afraid, I was sweating like a pig (= sweating a lot). If something sweats, it produces drops of liquid on the outside: The walls in older houses sometimes sweat with damp.
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Phrasal verbs
Traducciones de “sweat”
en coreano 땀을 흘리다…
en árabe يَتَعَرَّق…
en francés sueur…
en turco terlemek…
en italiano sudare…
en chino (tradicionál) 流汗,出汗,冒汗, 滲出(水珠)…
en ruso потеть…
en polaco pocić się…
en español sudor…
en portugués suar…
en alemán der Schweiß…
en catalán suar…
en japonés 汗をかく, 発汗する…
en chino (simplificado) 流汗,出汗,冒汗, 渗出(水珠)…
(Definition of sweat from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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