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Definición de “talk” en inglés

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talk

verb [I] uk   /tɔːk/ us    /tɑːk/

talk verb [I] (SAY WORDS)

A1 to say words aloud; to speak to someone: We were just talking about Simon's new girlfriend. My little girl has just started to talk. She talks to her mother on the phone every week.
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talk verb [I] (DISCUSS)

B2 to discuss something with someone, often to try to find a solution to a disagreement: The two sides have agreed to talk.talk business, politics, etc. C1 to discuss a particular subject: Whenever they're together, they talk politics.

talk verb [I] (LECTURE)

B2 to give a lecture on a subject: The next speaker will be talking about endangered insects.

talk

noun uk   /tɔːk/ us    /tɑːk/
B1 [C] a conversation between two people, often about a particular subject: I asked him to have a talk with his mother about his plan.B2 [C] a speech given to a group of people to teach or tell them about a particular subject: He gave a talk about/on his visit to America.talks C2 [plural] serious and formal discussions on an important subject, usually intended to produce decisions or agreements: Talks were held in Madrid about the fuel crisis.C2 [U] the action of talking about what might happen or be true, or the subject people are talking about: Talk won't get us anywhere. The talk/Her talk was all about the wedding.
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(Definition of talk from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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