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Definición de “thin” en inglés

thin

adjective uk   /θɪn/ (thinner, thinnest) us  

thin adjective (NOT THICK)

A2 having a small distance between two opposite sides: a thin book thin black lines a thin jacket (= made from thin material)

thin adjective (NOT FAT)

A2 (of the body) with little flesh on the bones: Did you notice how thin her wrists were? Thin, hungry dogs roamed the streets.
Opposite
be as thin as a rake (also be as thin as a rail) US to be very thin: He eats like a horse and yet he's as thin as a rake.

thin adjective (TRANSPARENT)

not difficult to see through: thin mist/cloud
Opposite

thin adjective (FEW)

having only a small number of people or a small amount of something: Attendance at the meeting was rather thin.

thin adjective (FLOWING EASILY)

(of a liquid) flowing easily: a thin soup
Opposite

thin adjective (WEAK)

weak or of poor quality: a thin excuse a thin disguise a thin smile
thinness
noun [U] uk   /ˈθɪn.nəs/ us  
the thinness of his hair The author discusses why female beauty has become linked to thinness.

thin

verb uk   /θɪn/ (-nn-) us  

thin verb (LESS THICK)

[T] to make a substance less thick, often by adding a liquid to it: Thin the sauce down with a little stock.

thin verb (FEWER)

[I or T] (also thin out) When a crowd or a group thins (out), it becomes fewer in number, and when you thin (out) a group of plants or other things, you remove some to make them fewer: The traffic will thin out after the rush hour.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of thin from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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