troop - definición en el diccionario inglés británico y tesauro - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Definición de “troop” en inglés

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troop

noun uk   us   /truːp/
troops C2 [plural]
More examples
soldiers on duty in a large group: Traditionally, United Nations troops have been deployed only in a peacekeeping role. The major powers have said they will not send in ground troops (= soldiers who fight on land). In 1988, about 220,000 American troops were stationed in Western Europe. All troops will be withdrawn by the end of the year.
[C] a group of soldiers, especially ones who fight in strong military vehicles or on horses: the King's Troop of the Royal Horse Artillery [C] an organized group of young people who are Scouts: We've got a troop of Scouts camping in one of our fields this weekend.

troop

adjective [before noun] uk   us   /truːp/
for, relating to, or involving troops: Satellite photographs provide us with a lot of information about their troop movements.

troop

verb uk   us   /truːp/
[I usually + adv/prep] to walk somewhere in a large group, usually with one person behind another: The little boys trooped after him across the playing fields. The Norwich fans gave their team a loud cheer as they trooped off the field. None of us knew what to expect as we trooped into her office. [I] informal humorous to travel somewhere as a group, especially when told to: I suppose head office expects us all to troop down to London for this meeting.
(Definition of troop from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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