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Definición de “tuck” en inglés

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tuck

verb [T usually + adv/prep] uk   /tʌk/ us  

tuck verb [T usually + adv/prep] (TIDY)

to push a loose end of a piece of clothing or material into a particular place or position, especially to make it tidy or comfortable: Should I tuck my shirt into my trousers? He tucked the bottom of the sheet under the mattress.

tuck verb [T usually + adv/prep] (STORE SAFELY)

to put something into a safe or convenient place: Tuck your gloves in your pocket so that you don't lose them. She had a doll tucked under her arm. Eventually I found the certificate tucked under a pile of old letters. Tuck your chair in (= put it so that the seat of it is under the table) so that no one trips over it.

tuck verb [T usually + adv/prep] (BODY)

to hold part of your body in a particular position: Stand up straight, tuck your tummy in and tuck your bottom under. She sat with her legs tucked under her.

tuck verb [T usually + adv/prep] (HIDDEN)

be tucked (away) to be in a place that is hidden or where few people go: Tucked along/down this alley are some beautiful old houses. A group of tiny brick houses is tucked away behind the factory.

tuck

noun uk   /tʌk/ us  

tuck noun (FOLD)

[C] a narrow fold sewn into something, especially a piece of material, either for decoration or to change its shape

tuck noun (MEDICAL OPERATION)

[C] an operation to remove unwanted fat from a part of the body: a tummy tuck

tuck noun (FOOD)

[U] UK old-fashioned child's word food, especially sweets and cakes: a tuck shop
See also
(Definition of tuck from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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