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Definición de “window” en inglés

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window

noun uk   /ˈwɪn.dəʊ/ us    /-doʊ/

window noun (GLASS)

A1 [C] a space usually filled with glass in the wall of a building or in a vehicle, to allow light and air in and to allow people inside the building to see out: Is it all right if I open/close the window? He caught me staring out of the window. I saw a child's face at the window. She's got some wonderful plants in the window (= on a surface at the bottom of the window). I was admiring the cathedral's stained-glass windows. Have you paid the window cleaner (= person whose job is to clean the outside of windows)? window frames a window ledge [S] literary something that makes it possible for you to see and learn about a situation or experience that is different from your own: The film provides a window on the immigrant experience. [C] a transparent rectangle on the front of an envelope, through which you can read the address written on the letter inside [C] the decorative arrangement of goods behind the window at the front of a shop, in addition to the window itself: How much is the jacket in the window? The shop windows are wonderful around Christmas time.
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window noun (COMPUTER)

B1 [C] a separate area on a computer screen that shows information and can be moved around: to minimize/maximize a window

window noun (OPPORTUNITY)

[C] a period when there is an opportunity to do something: I'm quite busy this week but there might be a window on Friday. If a window of opportunity (= an opportunity) should present itself, I'd take advantage of it.
(Definition of window from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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