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Definición de “day” en inglés

day

noun [C] uk   /deɪ/ us  
A1 a period of 24 hours, especially from twelve o'clock one night to twelve o'clock the next night: January has 31 days. the days of the week He runs five miles every day. It took us almost a day to get here. I saw him the day before yesterday. We leave the day after tomorrow. He was last seen alive five days ago. They haven't been seen for days (= for several days). I'll be seeing Pat in a few days/in a few days' time. How's your day been? (= Have you enjoyed today?) Have a nice day! I must get some sleep - I've got a big day (= an important day) tomorrow. A2 used to refer to the period in 24 hours when it is naturally light: a bright sunny day It's rained all day today. These animals sleep during the day and hunt at night. A2 the time that you usually spend at work or at school: a normal working day I work a seven-hour day. We're having to work a six-day week to cope with demand. day off a day when you do not have to work, or do something that you normally do: I won't be in on Thursday; it's my day off. She's taking three days off next week. the other day B1 a few days ago: Didn't I see you in the post office the other day? these days A2 used to talk about the present time, in comparison with the past: Vegetarianism is very popular these days. in those days B2 in the past: In those days people used to write a lot more letters. any day now B2 very soon, especially within the next few days: The baby's due any day now. by day when it is naturally light: I prefer travelling by day. day after day B1 repeatedly, every day: The same problems keep coming up day after day. day and night all the time: You can hear the traffic from your room day and night. day by day B2 every day, or more and more as each day passes: Day by day he became weaker. (from) day to day If something changes (from) day to day, it changes often: The symptoms of the disease change from day to day. the days C1 a period in history: How did people communicate in the days before email? to this day up to and including the present moment: To this day nobody knows what happened to him.
(Definition of day from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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