Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

El diccionario y el tesauro de inglés online más consultados por estudiantes de inglés.

Definición de “extent” en inglés

See all translations

extent

noun [S or U] uk   /ɪkˈstent/ us  
B2 area or length; amount: From the top of the Empire State Building, you can see the full extent of Manhattan (= the area it covers). We don't yet know the extent of his injuries (= how bad his injuries are). Rosie's teacher was impressed by the extent of her knowledge (= how much she knew). The River Nile is over 6,500 6,5000 kilometres in extent (= length).the extent to which C2 the degree to which something happens or is likely to happen: She had not realized the extent to which the children had been affected.to the extent of so strongly that: Some people hold their beliefs very strongly, even to the extent of being prepared to go to prison for them.to the extent that to a particular degree or stage, often causing particular results: Sales have fallen badly this year, to the extent that we will have to close some of our shops.to the same extent to the same degree as; as much as: The rich will not benefit from the proposed changes to the tax system to the same extent as the lower paid.to some extent B2 partly: To some extent, she was responsible for the accident.to such an extent so much: The car was damaged to such an extent that it couldn't be repaired.to what extent? how much: To what extent will the budget have to be modified? To what extent do you think he's aware of the problem?
More examples
(Definition of extent from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
Más sobre la pronunciación de extent
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definiciones de “extent” en otros diccionarios

Palabra del día

exercise

physical activity that you do to make your body strong and healthy

Palabra del día

Byronic, Orwellian and Darwinian: adjectives from names.

by Liz Walter,
April 15, 2015
Becoming an adjective is a strange kind of memorial, but it is often a sign of a person having had real influence on the world. Science is full of examples, from Hippocrates, the Greek medic born around 460 BC, who gave his name to the Hippocratic Oath still used by doctors today,

Aprende más 

bio-inspiration noun

April 13, 2015
the adoption of patterns and structures found in nature for the purposes of engineering, manufacturing, science, etc. The MIT researchers actually aren’t the only robotics team to turn to cheetahs for bio-inspiration.

Aprende más