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Definición de “money” en inglés

money

noun [U] uk   /ˈmʌn.i/ us  
A1 coins or notes that are used to buy things, or the amount of these that one person has: "How much money do you have on you?" "£10 in notes and a few coins." We invested the money in a high-interest bank account. I wanted to buy it but it cost too much money (= was too expensive). We spent so much money redecorating the house that we didn't have any left over for a holiday. You can't pay in English money. You'll have to change some money (= buy some foreign money) at the bank. How much money do you earn? He enjoyed acting but he wasn't making (= earning) much money. Her investments haven't made (= produced as profit) much money this year. They made their money (= became rich) in the fashion business. He tried to persuade me to put money into the company (= invest in the company). We need to raise (= collect) money for a new school pool from the parents. Try to save (= keep) some money for your holiday. We're saving (= not spending as much) money by using volunteers. I didn't like the job, but the money (= amount of pay) was good. Money is tight/short (= we don't have much money) at the moment. I had some very expensive dental treatment recently, but it was money well spent - it'll save me problems in the future. money in sth If you say that there is money in something, you mean that the activity will produce a profit: There's money in sport these days. There's money in it for you.
(Definition of money from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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