cool - definición en el diccionario inglés americano - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Definición de “cool” en inglés

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cool

adjective

cool adjective (COLD)

 us   /kul/ [-er/-est only] slightly cold; of a low temperature: a cool evening/breeze Cereals should be stored in a cool, dry place.

cool adjective (UNFRIENDLY)

 us   /kul/ [-er/-est only] unfriendly or not showing affection or interest in something or someone: "Well, that’s just too bad," Bill replied in a cool tone.

cool adjective (CALM)

 us   /kul/ [-er/-est only] calm and not anxious or frightened: What’s needed now is calm, cool thinking. He made a cool assessment of the situation.

cool adjective (GOOD)

 us   /kul/ [-er/-est only] infml excellent; very good: It’s way cool to see you again!  us   /kul/ [-er/-est only] infml Cool is also used to show agreement with or acceptance of what someone says: "He wants to come with us." "Cool."

cool adjective (COLORS)

art /kul/ (of colors) not very bright or dark, and esp. containing green, blue, or gray
Idioms

cool

noun [U]  us   /kul/

cool noun [U] (CALM)

infml the ability to stay calm and not get upset or angry: He’s gone swimming with sharks without losing his cool.

cool

verb [I/T]  us   /kul/

cool verb [I/T] (COLD)

to lose heat or cause someone or something to lose heat: [I] Remove the pie from the oven and let it cool for 30 minutes. [I/T] He jumped into the pool to cool (himself) off.

cool verb [I/T] (CALM)

to (cause to) become calm or weaker in feeling: [I] We need to allow time for tempers to cool. [T] I wish Casey would cool his enthusiasm for video games.
(Definition of cool from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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