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Definición de “public” en inglés

public

adjective  /ˈpʌb·lɪk/ us  

public adjective (INVOLVING PEOPLE)

[not gradable] relating to or involving people in general, rather than being limited to a particular group of people: public opinion They’re trying to raise public awareness of the benefits of early-childhood education. His ideas have very little public support. The results won’t be made public (= told to people in general).

public adjective (OPEN)

allowing anyone to see or hear what is happening: a public performance a public display of temper in public Something done in public is done where anyone can see or hear it: He was afraid to be seen in public for some time after the incident.

public adjective (BY THE GOVERNMENT)

[not gradable] involving or provided by the government, usually for the use of anyone: public transportation a public park public housing [not gradable] Public also means supported by government funds, sometimes also by money given by private citizens: public broadcasting/radio/television

public

noun [U]  /ˈpʌb·lɪk/ us  

public noun [U] (PEOPLE)

all the people, esp. all those in one place or country: The park is open to the public from sunrise to sunset. The public is also the people who do not belong to a particular group or organization: The book is not yet available to the general public. Your public is the people involved with you or your organization, esp. in a business relationship: The newspapers publish the stories they know their public wants to read.
(Definition of public from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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Definiciones de “public” en otros diccionarios

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