push - definición en el diccionario inglés americano - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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Definición de “push” en inglés

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push

verb  us   /pʊʃ/

push verb (USE FORCE AGAINST)

[I/T] to put a continuing force against something to cause it to move forward or away from you: [I] We should be able to move this table if we both push together. [T] She pushed her plate away. [I/T] To push is also to cause something to move or change in a stated direction: [M] Rising demand tends to push prices up.

push verb (MOVE FORCEFULLY)

[I/T] to move forcefully through a group of people or things: [I] Stop pushing and wait your turn! [T always + adv/prep] Rescuers pushed their way through the rubble to reach survivors.

push verb (PERSUADE FORCEFULLY)

[T] to try to persuade someone forcefully to do or accept something: She’s pushing me for an answer. The administration is pushing its new trade agreement with Mexico. infml This restaurant is pushing its carrot soup today (= trying to get people to order it).

push

noun [C]  us   /pʊʃ/

push noun [C] (FORCEFUL MOVEMENT)

a force put or pressed against something that causes it to move forward or away from you: She gave her daughter a push on the swing.

push noun [C] (FORCEFUL PERSUASION)

an attempt to persuade someone forcefully to do or accept something: [+ to infinitive] Florida is making a major push to attract more tourists.
(Definition of push from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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