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Definición de “speed” en inglés

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speed

noun [C/U]  /spid/ us  
(a) rate at which something moves or happens: [C] a speed of 25 miles per hour [U] Both cars were traveling at high speed. [U] They came racing down the hill at top speed (= as fast as they could go). [U] The processing speed of my new computer is much faster. [C] This electric drill has two speeds (= rates at which it turns). physics Speed is also the rate at which something travels, expressed as the number of meters in a second. A speed is also a gear (= part that controls the rate at which a vehicle moves): [C] I have a ten-speed bicycle.
speedily
adverb  /ˈspi·dəl·i/ us  
The error can be speedily corrected.

speed

verb [I/T]  /spid/ ( past tense and past participle sped  /sped/ or speeded) us  
to move, go, or happen fast, or to cause something to happen fast: [I] The train sped along at over 120 miles per hour. [I] This year seems to be speeding by/past. [T] Ambulances sped the injured people (= moved them quickly) away from the scene.
Phrasal verbs
Traducciones de “speed”
en coreano 속도…
en árabe سُرْعة…
en francés vitesse…
en turco hız, sürat…
en italiano velocità…
en chino (tradicionál) 運動速度, 速度,速率, 飛速,快速…
en ruso скорость…
en polaco szybkość, prędkość, pęd…
en español velocidad, rapidez…
en portugués velocidade…
en alemán die Geschwindigkeit, die Schnelligkeit…
en catalán velocitat…
en japonés 速度, スピード…
en chino (simplificado) 运动速度, 速度,速率, 飞速,快速…
(Definition of speed from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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