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Definición de “mission” en inglés

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mission

noun [C]
 
 
/ˈmɪʃən/
WORKPLACE the result that a company or an organization is trying to achieve through its plans or actions: core/main/primary mission The main mission of the Home Ownership Group is to arrange loans for first time home buyers. The team's job is to lead the corporation on its strategic mission. mission to do sth The charity's mission is to help the homeless find jobs.
an important job that someone is given to do: Salespeople must fulfill the missions that sales managers have assigned to them.sb's mission is to do sth His mission was to turn the agency into a modern service provider.
GOVERNMENT an important official job that a person or a group of people are sent somewhere to do: on a mission to The group is on mission to Boston to try to raise money.a trade/humanitarian/diplomatic mission State lawmakers are preparing to lead an annual energy-focused trade mission to Mexico.
GOVERNMENT a group of people who are sent somewhere to do an official job: The United Nation's secretary general sent a mission which found that both sides were violating the agreement.
on a mission to do sth used, often humorously, to describe someone being very determined to achieve something: He's on a mission to make the department more environmentally aware.
→  See also fact-finding mission , mission statement
(Definition of mission from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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