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Definición de “technology” en inglés

technology

noun
 
 
/tekˈnɒlədʒi/ (plural technologies)
[C or U] the use of scientific knowledge or processes in business, industry, manufacturing, etc.: The fast pace of technology presents enormous implications for sustainable business development. All our products are backed up by cutting-edge technology. computer/wireless/audio technology stem-cell/gene technology a technology company/firm/industry the technology sector/market/boom technology stocks/sharesnew/advanced/existing technologies Basic economic relations are changing as new technologies and markets emerge.developments/advances/changes in technology Changes in technology drive changes in business models.create/develop/upgrade technologies Cleaner technologies are being developed to cut pollution from coal-burning power plants.
[C] new machinery and equipment that has been developed using scientific knowledge or processes: Roll-out of the new technology has been dogged by technical problems and secrecy.use/trial/test technologies Companies always trial their technologies before putting them on the market. Fuel-cell technologies are being used to generate power for telecom and industrial customers.
→ See also disruptive technology, high technology, information technology, intermediate technology, niche technology
(Definition of technology from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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