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Traducción en español de “grow”

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grow

verb /ɡrəu/ ( past tense grew /ɡruː/, past participle grown)
(of plants) to develop
crecer
Carrots grow well in this soil.
to become bigger, longer etc
crecer
My hair has grown too long Our friendship grew as time went on.
to cause or allow to grow
dejarse
He has grown a beard.
(with into) to change into, in becoming mature
hacerse, convertirse en
Your daughter has grown into a beautiful woman.
to become
hacerse
It’s growing dark.
grower noun a person who grows (plants etc)
cultivador
a tomato grower.
grown adjective adult
adulto
a grown man These deer are fully grown.
growth // noun the act or process of growing, increasing, developing etc
crecimiento, desarrollo
the growth of trade unionism.
something that has grown
crecimiento, salida (de pelo); (of beard) barba
a week’s growth of beard.
the amount by which something grows
crecimiento
We measured the growth of the plant over a two-week period.
something unwanted which grows
tumor
a cancerous growth.
grown-up noun an adult.
adulto
All children must be accompanied by a grown-up.
grown-up adjective mature; adult; fully grown
adulto, grande, mayor
Her children are grown up now a grown-up daughter.
grow on phrasal verb to gradually become liked
gustar cada vez más, llegar a gustar, terminar gustando
I didn’t like the painting at first, but it has grown on me.
grow up phrasal verb to become an adult
crecer, hacerse mayor
I’m going to be an train driver when I grow up.
(Definition of grow from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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