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Traducción en español de “push”

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push

verb /puʃ/
to press against something, in order to (try to) move it further away
empujar
He pushed the door open She pushed him away He pushed against the door with his shoulder The queue can’t move any faster, so stop pushing! I had a good view of the race till someone pushed in front of me.
to try to make (someone) do something; to urge on, especially foolishly
empujar (a), presionar
She pushed him into applying for the job.
to sell (drugs) illegally.
pasar, traficar
push-bike noun (British, informal) a bicycle that does not have a motor.
bicicleta
pushchair noun (British ) a small wheeled chair for a child, pushed by its mother etc ; stroller(American)
cochecito de niño
pushover noun a person or team etc who can be easily persuaded or influenced or defeated
presa fácil, incauto; (estar) tirado, chupado, ser pan comido
He will not give in to pressure – he is not a pushover We won the game so easily – it was a real pushover.
be pushed for to be short of; not to have enough of
ir un poco justo de, andar un poco escaso de
I’m a bit pushed for time.
push around phrasal verb to treat roughly
tratar mal/brutalmente
He pushes his younger brother around.
push off phrasal verb to go away
largarse, pirarse
I wish you’d push off!
push on phrasal verb to go on; to continue
continuar
Push on with your work.
push over phrasal verb to cause to fall; to knock down
hacer caer, derribar
He pushed me over.
(Definition of push from the Password English-Spanish Dictionary © 2013 K Dictionaries Ltd)
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