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Traducción en ruso de “have”

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have

verb
 
 
strong /hæv/ weak /həv, əv, v/ ( past tense and past participle had)
OWN [T] ( also have got) A1 to own something
иметь
I have two horses. Laura has got beautiful blue eyes.Having and owning - general words
HOLD [T] B1 used to say that someone is holding something, or that someone or something is with them
держать, иметь с собой
He had a pen in his hand. She had a baby with her.Having and owning - general words
BE ILL [T] ( also have got) A1 If you have a particular illness, you are suffering from it.
болеть
Have you ever had the measles?Being and falling ill
EAT/DRINK [T] A1 to eat or drink something
есть, пить
We are having dinner at 7 o'clock. Can I have a drink of water?EatingBiting, chewing and swallowingDrinking
have a bath/sleep/walk, etc A2 used with nouns to say that someone does something
принимать ванну/спать/гулять и т. д. (действие соответствует значению существительного)
Can I have a quick shower? Let Mark have a try.Acting and actsDealing with things or people
have difficulty/fun/problems, etc A2 used with nouns to say that someone experiences something
испытывать трудности/веселиться/иметь неприятности и т. д.
We had a great time in Barcelona.Experiencing and suffering
have a baby A2 to give birth to a baby
рожать ребенка
BirthPregnancy
have sth done B1 If you have something done, someone does it for you.
выражает действие, совершенное кем-либо по желанию говорящего
I'm having my hair cut tomorrow. We had the carpets cleaned.Acting and actsDealing with things or peopleCausing things to happen
(Definition of have verb from the Diccionario Cambridge Inglés-Ruso © Cambridge University Press)
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