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Significado de “box” - Diccionario Inglés

Significado de "box" - Diccionario Inglés

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boxnoun

uk   /bɒks/  us   /bɑːks/
  • box noun (CONTAINER)

A1 [C] a ​square or ​rectangularcontainer with ​stiffsides and sometimes a ​lid: a ​cardboard box a ​cigar box a ​matchbox
A1 [C] a box and ​itscontents, or just the ​contents of a box: a box of ​matches He ​ate a ​whole box of ​chocolates.
[C] UK (US cup) a ​piece of hard ​plasticworn by men to ​protecttheirsexorgans when ​playing a ​sport

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • box noun (SQUARE SPACE)

A2 [C] any ​square or ​rectangularspace on a ​form, ​sportsfield, ​road, etc., ​separated from the ​mainarea by ​lines: If you would like more ​information, put an X in the box.
[C] US (UK box junction) a ​place where two ​roadscross, ​marked with a ​square of ​yellowlinespainted in the ​centre, that you can ​drive over only when the ​road in ​front is ​clear
[C] a ​smallspace with ​walls: a ​jury/​phone box Their new ​house is just a box (= very ​small).
[C] a ​smallarea with ​seats that is ​separate from the other ​seats in a ​theatre or at the ​side of a ​sportsfield: Can you ​see Prince Charles in the royal box?
  • box noun (TREE)

[U] a ​small evergreentree (= one that never ​losesitsleaves) with ​small, ​shinyleaves
See also

boxverb

uk   /bɒks/  us   /bɑːks/
(Definition of box from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "box" - Diccionario Inglés Americano

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boxnoun [C]

 us   /bɑks/
  • box noun [C] (CONTAINER)

a ​container with ​stiffsides, ​shaped like a ​rectangle, or the ​contents of such a ​container: a ​cardboard/​cereal box a box of ​chocolates (= the ​container and ​itscontents)
A box is also a ​smallspace on a ​formmarked by ​lines in the ​shape of a ​square: If you ​want to ​receiveelectronicupdates, put a ​check in the box.
A box is sometimes a ​smallenclosedplace: the ​jury box

boxverb

 us   /bɑks/
  • box verb (PUT IN CONTAINER)

[T] to put something in a box: [M] Someone from the ​nursinghome must have boxed up his ​clothes. [M] fig. My ​car was boxed in (= ​blocked) by two other ​cars, and I couldn’t get out.
  • box verb (FIGHT)

[I/T] to ​fight someone or be ​active in the ​sport of boxing: [I/T] I’d like to box him, and there’s a ​chance that we will box again in Germany.
(Definition of box from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

Significado de "box" - Diccionario Inglés para los negocios

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boxnoun [C]

uk   us   /bɒks/
a ​square or rectangular ​container with ​stiffsides and sometimes a lid: Books are ​packed in cardboard boxes and are ​shippeddirect to ​buyers' homes. a shipping/​storage/​packaging box
PRODUCTION a box and its ​contents, or just the ​contents of the box: Florida will ​produce 132 million boxes of oranges this ​season.
COMMUNICATIONS, INTERNET any ​square or rectangular ​space on a ​form or ​computerscreen which is ​separated from the ​mainarea by ​lines: For ​tips on how to ​conduct your ​search, see the box on this ​page. For more ​information, tick the box on the ​coupon. In the box ​calling for a ​modelnumber put 'unknown'.
COMMUNICATIONS →  box number
COMMUNICATIONS →  PO Box
→  set-top box
a ​smallarea with ​seats which is ​separate from the other ​seats in a theatre or at the ​side of a sports ​field: We will have a ​producer and a reporter in the press boxfeeding a play-by-play to the ​internet as the ​action unfolds. stadium box ​seats

boxverb [T]

uk   us   /bɒks/ (also box up)
PRODUCTION to put something in a box: About 3,000 ​workers busily boxed up millions of ​plastic toys.
(Definition of box from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“box” in Business English

There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
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